Privacy Policy
Advertisement
After the TSP, I invest my money in Betterment and Vanguard. I track all of my investments with Personal Capital. I also wrote a short, 2 hour book summarizing this site. You can buy it here.

Military Money Manual (MMM) takes the privacy of our visitors very seriously. This Privacy Policy outlines the types of personal information that is received and collected and how it is used.

This Privacy Policy is reviewed and revised from time to time. You will want to revisit it regularly. Your use of this site, in any and all forms, constitutes an acceptance of this Privacy Policy.

1. Log Files

We use log files like many other websites. The information in the log files include:

  • Internet Protocol addresses (IP)
  • Types of browser
  • Internet Service Provider (ISP)
  • Date and time stamp
  • Referring and exit pages
  • Number of clicks

All of this information is not linked to anything that is personally identifiable.

2. Cookies

Spy-vs-spyWe use cookies to store information about visitor preferences and to record user-specific information on visits and pages the user views so as to provide a custom experience. In regard to third-party advertisers, Military Money Manual has no access or control over these cookies. You should review the respective privacy policies on any and all third-party ad servers for more information regarding their practices and how to opt-out.

If you wish to disable cookies you may do so through your web browser options. Instructions for doing so and for other cookie-related management can be found on the specific web browsers’ websites.

DoubleClick DART Cookie

Google, a third party vendor, uses the DART cookie to serve ads on MMM. Users may opt out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting Google’s Content Network Privacy Policy.

This blog (www.militarymoneymanual.com) does not share personal information with third parties nor do we store any information about your visit to this blog other than to analyze and optimize your content and reading experience through the use of cookies.

You can turn off the use of cookies at anytime by changing your specific browser settings.

We are not responsible for republished content from this blog on other blogs or websites without our permission.

In accordance with FTC guidelines, we state that we may have a financial relationship with companies mentioned in this website. This may include receiving access to free products and services for product and service reviews and giveaways.

Per FTC guidelines, this website may be compensated by companies mentioned through advertising, affiliate programs or otherwise. Any references to third party products, rates, or websites are subject to change without notice. Please do the appropriate research before participating in any third party offers.

This privacy policy is subject to change without notice and was last updated on Dec 22, 2013. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly here: [email protected]

2 Websites I Use to Achieve Financial Independence

The best way I know to achieve financial independence is to keep your investments simple, diversified, automatic, and low-cost. Costs eat into your returns like you wouldn't believe! A 1% difference in expense ratios can mean $100,000s lost to fees over a lifetime of investing.

Even if you're a DIY (do-it-yourself) investor like I am, you need to check out Betterment. You can read my full review here, but the bottom line is for only $250 per $100,000 invested (0.25% expense ratio) you get simple, diversified, and automated investing. In addition every account now gets free Tax Loss Harvesting+ features, which should increase returns for the average investor more than the minuscule management fee.

If you're not a DIY investor or are just getting started with investing, then you definitely need to check out Betterment. It's what I recommend to my family and friends who aren't strong investors or don't care to learn about asset allocations, diversification, or rebalancing.

I have investment accounts all over the place. To keep track of all of them in one place I use Personal Capital. It combines all of my accounts, shows me where I may be overpaying in fees, and provides beautiful charts showing my overall asset allocation and performance.

I use Personal Capital to track my Roth and Traditional TSP, Vanguard IRAs, banking accounts, SDP, and my Betterment taxable account, all in one place. It's free, secure and presents me with a one-stop dashboard so I can see all my money on one site.

Read my full review of Personal Capital and see how easy it can be to manage your investments in one place. Trust me, once you try it, you'll love it.

P.S. - If you have over $100,000 of assets and a 401k, you really need to run the Personal Capital 401k Fee Analyzer.

Privacy Policy

What are your thoughts?